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BUILDING
 
 
Serpentine Gallery Pavilion
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DESIGNER
 
 
BIG
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CONTEXT
 
Location
BIG, Bjarke Ingels, Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2016, London, Kensington Garden, Hyde Park
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DESCRIPTION
 
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Bjarke Ingels, BIG, Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2016, LondonThe Serpentine reveals the designs for its expanded Architecture Programme for 2016: the 16th annual Pavilion designed by Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) (Copenhagen/New York) and four newly commissioned Summer Houses by Kunlé Adeyemi – NLÉ (Amsterdam/Lagos), Barkow Leibinger (Berlin/New York), Yona Friedman (Paris) and Asif Khan (London). The Summer Houses are inspired by Queen Caroline’s Temple, a classical style summer house built in 1734 and a stone’s throw from the Serpentine Gallery.

BIG, Bjarke Ingels, Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2016, London, Kensington Garden, Hyde ParkIntroducing contemporary architecture to a wider audience, the Serpentine Architecture Programme presents a unique exhibition of contemporary international architecture in the built form, rather than through an exhibition of models, drawings and plans. Each of the five architects, aged between 36 and 93, have not completed a permanent structure in the UK.

The Serpentine Pavilion, designed by Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG), is an ‘unzipped wall’ that is transformed from straight line to three-dimensional space, creating a dramatic structure that by day houses a café and free family activities and by night becomes a space for the Serpentine’s acclaimed Park Nights programme of performative works by artists, writers and musicians. Kunlé Adeyemi’s Summer House is an inverse replica of Queen Caroline’s Temple - a tribute to its robust form, space and material, recomposed into a new sculptural object. Barkow Leibinger were inspired by another, now extinct, 18th Century pavilion also designed by William Kent, which rotated and offered 360 degree views of the Park. Yona Friedman’s Summer House takes the form of a modular structure that can be assembled and disassembled in different formations and builds upon the architect’s pioneering project La Ville Spatiale (Spatial City) begun in the late 1950s. Asif Khan’s design is inspired by the fact that Queen Caroline’s Temple was positioned in a way that it would allow it to catch the sunlight from The Serpentine lake.

Serpentine Galleries Director, Julia Peyton-Jones, and Co-Director, Hans Ulrich Obrist, said: “We are delighted to reveal the designs for our expanded Architecture Programme. As you can see from the architect’s renders, Bjarke Ingels has responded to the brief for a multi-purpose Pavilion with a supremely elegant structure that is both curvaceous wall and soaring spire, that will surely serve as a beacon - drawing visitors across Hyde Park and Kensington Gardens to visit the Pavilion, the Summer Houses and our major exhibitions by Alex Katz and Etel Adnan. The response to design a Summer House inspired by the 18th Century Queen Caroline’s Temple by our four international architects has been equally inspired and has produced four unique spaces for visitors to explore this summer. “
Architect’s Statement
Bjarke Ingels, BIG, Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2016, LondonFor the Serpentine Pavilion 2016, we have attempted to design a structure that embodies multiple aspects that are often perceived as opposites: a structure that is free-form yet rigorous, modular yet sculptural, both transparent and opaque, both solid box and blob.

Bjarke Ingels, BIG, Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2016, LondonWe decided to work with one of the most basic elements of architecture: the brick wall. Rather than clay bricks or stone blocks, the wall is erected from pultruded fibreglass frames stacked on top of each other. The wall is then pulled apart to form a cavity within it, to house the events of the Pavilion’s programme. This unzipping of the wall turns the line into a surface, transforming the wall into a space. A complex three-dimensional environment is created which can be explored and experienced in a variety of ways, inside and outside. At the top, the wall appears like a straight line, while the bottom, it forms a sheltered valley at the entrance of the Pavilion and an undulating hillside towards the Park.

The unzipped walls creates a cave-like canyon lit through the fiberglass frames and gaps between the shifted boxes, as well as throgh the translucent resin of fiberglass. As a result, the shifting overlaps as well as the movement and presence of people outside create a lively play of light and shadow on the cave walls within.

The materials include wooden floors and extruded Fiberline profiles, providing every surface with a warm glow and linear texture – from the mesh of woven glass fibres to the undulating lines of the grain of the wood.

This simple manipulation of the archetypal space-defining garden wall creates a presence in the park that changes as you move around and as you move through it. The North-South elevation of the Pavilion is a perfect rectangle. The East-West elevation is an undulating sculptural silhouette. Towards the East-West, the Pavilion is completely opaque and material. Towards the North-South, it is an entirely transparent and pratically immaterial. As a result, presence becomes absence, orthogonal becomes curvilinear, structure becomes gesture, and box becomes blob.
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The Pavilion has two exits, one at each end of the longitudinal dimension.

A public space during the day (lOam — 6pm) and a forum for learning, debate and entertainment at night

The Harrods cafe is located inside the Pavilion
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Bjarke Ingels, BIG, Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2016, London
Serpentine Pavilion History
The Serpentine's Pavilion commission, conceived in 2000 by Director Julia Peyton-Jones, has become an international site for architectural experimentation and has presented projects by some of the world's greatest architects. Each Pavilion is sited on the Serpentine Gallery's lawn for four months and the immediacy of the commission - taking a maximum of six months from invitation to completion - provides a unique model worldwide.

The selection of the architects, chosen for consistently extending the boundaries of architecture practice, is led by the Serpentine's core curatorial thinking, introducing contemporary artists and architects to a wider audience. The brief is to design a 300-square-metre Pavilion that is used as a cafe by day and a forum for learning, debate and entertainment at night.

Serpentine Gallery Pavilion LondonSerpentine Pavilion architects to date are:
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VIDEO
 
 




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MATERIALS
 
fiberglass, composites, wood

Bjarke Ingels, BIG, Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2016, London

  • The boxes used to build the Pavilion are both the structure and the envelope.

  • Main structure — extruded glass fibre sheets 400 x 500mm glued individual boxes (bricks). The modular components are joined by a cross profile aluminium extrusions that transfers the load from box to box.

  • Total number of 400x500mm glass fibre boxes: 1802

  • Total length of cross section aluminium connectors: l500m

  • Floor: wooden floor, 500mm wide planks.

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LOCATION
 
Continent
North America
Nation
Canada
Province
British Columbia
Regional district
Greater Vancouver
Town
Vancouver
Address
Thurlow Street
 
 
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MAP
 
 
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TYPOLOGY
 
ARCHITECTURE
Commercial buildings
Bars, cafeterias
Urban equipment and structures for public areas
Structures for public areas
Other architectural structures
Pavilions, kiosks, facilities
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CHRONOLOGY
 
Project
2016 - 2016    
Realisation
2016 - 2016
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BIBILIOGRAPHIC REFERENCES
 
 
"Box clever", Architecture Today 269, june 2016, pp. 36-45
Miriam Sitz, "Bjarke Ingels Group to design 2016 Serpentine Pavilion", Architectural Record 3/2016, march 2016, p. 30
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ADDITIONS AND DIGRESSIONS
 
 
Pavilion and Summer Houses 2016   » AR dossiers
Queen Carolines Temple, Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2016, Summer House, London
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CLIENT
 
 
Serpentine Gallery
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DIMENSIONAL
DATA
 
Surface
site sq.m. 541
gross internal sq.m. 273
  • The Pavilion is defined by a rectilinear axis perpendicular to the Serpentine Gallery and two sine curves tangent to the axis.

  • Longitudinal dimension of the Pavilion (in the perpendicular axis to the Gallery): 27m Widest dimension between sine curves: 12m

  • Maximum height (in the perpendicular axis to the Gallery): 14m

  • Interior usable area (2.4m head height): 167 sqm

  • lOm max ceiling height internally

  • 2.4m min ceiling height internally
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STAFF
 
Project
BIG Bjarke Ingels Group
Design team
Jenn Grossman, Daria Pahhota, Maria Sole Bravo
Planning and organization
DP9
Barnaby Collins with Katie Smith
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ANNOTATIONS
 
 
Installation period: 10 June / 9 October 2016

Bjarke Ingels, BIG, Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2016, London













The pavilion was purchased by Westbank moving it to Vancouver and is located at the foot of the Westbank's Shaw Tower.



Serpentine Gallery Pavilion London
See others Serpentine Gallery Pavilions
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CREDITS
 
 
Photos © Iwan Baan, Luke Hayes, Jim Stephenson
Drawings © Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG)
Text edited by Serpentine Gallery
Courtesy of Serpentine Gallery

Bjarke Ingels, BIG, Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2016, London



If you haven't already clicked on the photo strip at the top of the page, for the gallery of photos [10 images] and drawings [4 images], enter here
 
 
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